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Japan Business Etiquette

Basic Japan Etiquette

A quick look at the most important ‚rules‘ The good news: as a Westerner, most Japanese will forgive most of the faux pas you make while visiting their country. When these occur, most will simply think, “Oh, gaijin (foreigner)” and not think anything of it. Nonetheless, below are a few descriptions of common stumbling blocks and what the Japanese about them. You can decide how you would act in such situations.
General Runny Noses In Japan we can safely disregard our parents‘ instructions about blowing our noses and to quit snuffling about. Here, blowing our nose with the aid of a handkerchief is seen as dirty, disgusting and embarrassing. Here, one snuffles, or if he must, seeks out a quiet place to blow his nose. The masks you sometimes see people in Japan wearing is a sign that they have a cold. They wear the masks to keep their germs to themselves out of consideration for everyone else on the subway, at work, etc. Body Contact: People in Japan generally maintain a greater distance between one another. While European countries practice different degrees of embracing one another when greeting and saying goodbye to others, don’t forget that Japanese prefer a bit more physical distance. Not allowing for this may come across as a bit too overbearing.
© Ulrike Froehlich 2019 “A Bridge for Business” - Understanding Japan - CONTACT Ulrike Froehlich, Understanding Japan - Froehlich Management Consulting ulrike.froehlich@understanding-japan.de , +49-(0)7621-5501882  (WhatsApp ok)

Basic Japan Etiquette

A quick look at the most important ‚rules‘ The good news: as a Westerner, most Japanese will forgive most of the faux pas you make while visiting their country. When these occur, most will simply think, “Oh, gaijin (foreigner)” and not think anything of it. Nonetheless, below are a few descriptions of common stumbling blocks and what the Japanese about them. You can decide how you would act in such situations.
General Runny Noses In Japan we can safely disregard our parents‘ instructions about blowing our noses and to quit snuffling about. Here, blowing our nose with the aid of a handkerchief is seen as dirty, disgusting and embarrassing. Here, one snuffles, or if he must, seeks out a quiet place to blow his nose. The masks you sometimes see people in Japan wearing is a sign that they have a cold. They wear the masks to keep their germs to themselves out of consideration for everyone else on the subway, at work, etc. Body Contact: People in Japan generally maintain a greater distance between one another. While European countries practice different degrees of embracing one another when greeting and saying goodbye to others, don’t forget that Japanese prefer a bit more physical distance. Not allowing for this may come across as a bit too overbearing.

FOR BUSINESS

© Ulrike Froehlich 2019
“A Bridge for Business” - Understanding Japan -
Understanding Japan- Froehlich Management Consulting ulrike.froehlich@understanding-japan.de +49-(0)7621-5501882 (WhatsApp ok) Weil am Rhein - Germany